Opinions on Telephone

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"Phone" redirects here. For other uses, see Phone (disambiguation) and Telephone (disambiguation).

A telephone, or phone, is a telecommunications device that permits two or more users to conduct a conversation when they are too far apart to be heard directly. A telephone converts sound, typically and most efficiently the human voice, into electronic signals suitable for transmission via cables or other transmission media over long distances, and replays such signals simultaneously in audible form to its user.

A communication device for sailing vessels The Telephone was the invention of a captain John Taylor in 1844. Taylor's communication device used compressed air to sound musical notes through a horn in order to communicate with sailing vessels in foggy weather. Later, c. 1860, Johann Philipp Reis used the term in reference to his Reis telephone, his device appears to be the first such device based on conversion of sound into electrical impulses, the term telephone was adopted into the vocabulary of many languages. It is derived from the Greek: τῆλε, tēle, "far" and φωνή, phōnē, "voice", together meaning "distant voice". In 1876, Alexander Graham Bell was the first to be granted a United States patent for a device that produced clearly intelligible replication of the human voice. This instrument was further developed by many others. The telephone was the first device in history that enabled people to talk directly with each other across large distances. Telephones rapidly became indispensable to businesses, government, and households, and are today some of the most widely used small appliances.

The essential elements of a telephone are a microphone (transmitter) to speak into and an earphone (receiver) which reproduces the voice in a distant location. In addition, most telephones contain a ringer which produces a sound to announce an incoming telephone call, and a dial used to enter a telephone number when initiating a call to another telephone. Until approximately the 1970s most telephones used a rotary dial, which was superseded by the modern DTMF push-button dial, first introduced to the public by AT&T in 1963. The receiver and transmitter are usually built into a handset which is held up to the ear and mouth during conversation. The dial may be located either on the handset, or on a base unit to which the handset is connected. The transmitter converts the sound waves to electrical signals which are sent through the telephone network to the receiving phone. The receiving telephone converts the signals into audible sound in the receiver, or sometimes a loudspeaker. Telephones permit duplex communication, meaning they allow the people on both ends to talk simultaneously.

A landline telephone is connected by a pair of wires to the telephone network, while a mobile phone, such as a cellular phone, is portable and communicates with the telephone network by radio transmissions. The public switched telephone network has many switching centers that interconnect telephones around the world for direct communication with each other. Each telephone line has an identifying telephone number. To initiate a telephone call the user enters the destination telephone's number into a dial or numeric keypad on the phone. Graphic symbols used to designate telephone service or phone-related information in print, signage, and other media include (U+2121), (U+260E), (U+260F), (U+2706), and (U+2315).

Although originally designed for simple voice communications, convergence has enabled most modern telephones to have many additional capabilities. They may be able to record spoken messages, send and receive text messages, take and display photographs or video, play music or games, surf the Internet, do road navigation or immerse the user in virtual reality. A current trend is phones that integrate all mobile communication and computing needs; these are called smartphones.

  1. ^ Timbs, John; "Year Book of Facts in Science and Art", 1844 edition, p. 55. Google Books. This citation is referred to also in the book "The Telephone and Telephone Exchanges" by J. E. Kingsbury published in 1915.
  2. ^ Dodd, Annabel Z., The Essential Guide to Telecommunications. Prentice Hall PTR, 2002, p. 183.

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