Opinions on African trypanosomiasis

Here you have a list of opinions about African trypanosomiasis and you can also give us your opinion about it.
You will see other people's opinions about African trypanosomiasis and you will find out what the others say about it.
Also, you will see opinions about other terms. Do not forget to leave your opinion about this topic and others related.



For "Sleepy sickness", see Encephalitis lethargica.

African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness is a parasitic disease of humans and other animals. It is caused by protozoa of the species Trypanosoma brucei. There are two types that infect humans, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T.b.g) and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (T.b.r.). T.b.g causes over 98% of reported cases. Both are usually transmitted by the bite of an infected tsetse fly and are most common in rural areas.

Initially, in the first stage of the disease, there are fevers, headaches, itchiness, and joint pains. This begins one to three weeks after the bite. Weeks to months later the second stage begins with confusion, poor coordination, numbness and trouble sleeping. Diagnosis is via finding the parasite in a blood smear or in the fluid of a lymph node. A lumbar puncture is often needed to tell the difference between first and second stage disease.

Prevention of severe disease involves screening the population at risk with blood tests for T.b.g. Treatment is easier when the disease is detected early and before neurological symptoms occur. Treatment of the first stage is with the medications pentamidine or suramin. Treatment of the second stage involves: eflornithine or a combination of nifurtimox and eflornithine for T.b.g. While melarsoprol works for both it is typically only used for T.b.r. due to serious side effects.

The disease occurs regularly in some regions of sub-Saharan Africa with the population at risk being about 70 million in 36 countries. As of 2010 it caused around 9,000 deaths per year, down from 34,000 in 1990. An estimated 30,000 people are currently infected with 7000 new infections in 2012. More than 80% of these cases are in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Three major outbreaks have occurred in recent history: one from 1896 to 1906 primarily in Uganda and the Congo Basin and two in 1920 and 1970 in several African countries. Other animals, such as cows, may carry the disease and become infected.


In the image below, you can see a graph with the evolution of the times that people look for African trypanosomiasis. And below it, you can see how many pieces of news have been created about African trypanosomiasis in the last years.
Thanks to this graph, we can see the interest African trypanosomiasis has and the evolution of its popularity.

What do you think of African trypanosomiasis?

You can leave your opinion about African trypanosomiasis here as well as read the comments and opinions from other people about the topic.
It's important that all of us leave our opinions about African trypanosomiasis to have a better knowledge about it: